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Mexico will likely see the highest real trade growth in Latin America this year. Here trucks crossing the US border. (Photo: US Department of Transport)
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Monday, February 2, 2015
Special Reports

Latin America 2015: The Trade Outlook

Countries with US free trade agreements stand to benefit from US pickup.

BY LATINVEX STAFF

Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic are expected to lead the way in Latin America trade growth this year, while Venezuela and Argentina will see the worst declines, according to a Latinvex analysis of predictions from Bulltick Capital Markets, JP Morgan and the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

On average, Latin America should see a 4.2 percent increase in the volume of exports of goods and services this year, while imports are likely to grow by 3.8 percent.

“The trade outlook for Latin America and the Caribbean is bleak due to the generalized fall in the demand, in almost all advanced and emerging market economies, for the commodities traditionally exported by the region,” says Isaac Cohen, president of Inverway and a former Washington director for the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). “The exception has to do with the fact that the only advanced economy that is growing is the United States. Therefore,....


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Keywords: Argentina, Bulltick Capital Markets, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, ECLAC, Ecuador, IMF, Inverway, JP Morgan, Mexico, Venezuela

THE NUMBERS
Latin America 2015: Estimated Export Growth
Latin America 2015: Estimated Import Growth


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